How I Hacked a Bitcoin Wallet: A Step By Step Guide ...

"Here’s the Solution to the 3 Year Old, $50,000 Bitcoin Puzzle". How one programmer cracked the private key to a Bitcoin wallet hidden in a painting.

submitted by DanteShamest to programming [link] [comments]

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet submitted by Link0000054 to Bitcoin_2019 [link] [comments]

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet submitted by Ranzware to BitNewsLive [link] [comments]

Here's Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet

From #Bitcoinist, Here's Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet https://upload.news/zmazm | #Bitcoin #BTC #Finance #Ethereum, #Blockchain #Cryptocurrency #Tech -> @MintingCoins #MintingCoins
submitted by GaryPalmerJr to MintingCoins [link] [comments]

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet submitted by ThrillerPodcast to thrillerpodcast [link] [comments]

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet

Here’s Exactly How Long it Would Take to Crack Your Bitcoin Wallet submitted by n4bb to CoinPath [link] [comments]

How easy is it to crack an Electrum password? Found my wallet from 2015... /r/Bitcoin

How easy is it to crack an Electrum password? Found my wallet from 2015... /Bitcoin submitted by cryptoanalyticabot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

How easy is it to crack an Electrum password? Found my wallet from 2015... /r/Bitcoin

How easy is it to crack an Electrum password? Found my wallet from 2015... /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

This isn't bitcoin mining exactly but it's essentially the same, I have a bitcoin wallet that's inside an encrypted 7z file, I'm trying to figure out how to crack the file or the ciphered password. /r/RBI and myself have been working on it for a little and looks like I need more help.

This isn't bitcoin mining exactly but it's essentially the same, I have a bitcoin wallet that's inside an encrypted 7z file, I'm trying to figure out how to crack the file or the ciphered password. /RBI and myself have been working on it for a little and looks like I need more help. submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: "Here’s the Solution to the 3 Year Old, $50,000 Bitcoin Puzzle". How one programmer cracked the private key to a Bitcoin wallet hidden in a painting. /r/programming

submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

How long would it take a supercomputer to crack a 50 bit password BIP38 wallet? /r/Bitcoin

How long would it take a supercomputer to crack a 50 bit password BIP38 wallet? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Tax question about lack of record-keeping of very early coins.

Here is my situation if anyone can offer advice, even advice about where to ask for advice.
I bought and transacted a small amount of bitcoins starting in 2011. Back then the community was very different and I have kept no records of those years and don't have the exact wallet files or addresses anymore.
In 2012 through stupidity I lost my passwords to everything. I've lived a poomodest life for 8 years.
Fast foward to today, I've recently found and cracked one old wallet with "$300" worth... over $5 million.
I don't mind to pay tax on it, I'm resigned to giving up half, but what I'm worried about is if they ask where I got the money from and I can't explain or prove it because it's over 9 years ago, what are the risks that gov would take ALL of it?
Most of my earliest coins where bought by privately trading with people who took my "Liberty Reserve" dollars - a service that doesn't exist anymore, and the coins put in mybitcoin.com or mtgox.com, two more services that don't exist anymore.
In turn, it's so long ago that I don't have records or even remember how my Liberty Reserve accounts were funded in the first place.
What would you do? Or what experts specifically would you try to contact about it? Not to evade tax and keep all of it, but just to ensure I get it through the right process to keep half of it?
submitted by rand502 to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

[ilpt] my indepth guide to ewhoring (250+ a day)

New to this forum so id like to share some of my experience with one of the things that made me a lot, ewhoring.
1) first of your going to want to create a snapchat account, this account must have a high enough snapscore of a couple of thousand to make it look legit as possible, you can boost the snapscore of the account by sending tons of snaps to a bunch of celebrity accounts on snapchat. You can easily find these buy just searching any letter in the search bar and subscribing to all the accounts. add a bitmoji that looks like your girl, you can find a ton of mega links on the internet if you look, try find something not saturated and you should be fine. A good way to look legit on snapchat is of course to send live snaps. To send live snaps uploaded through your camera roll. On iPhone you can use the app prequel. on android you can use chicken cam. Other ways to look legit is to fake your location of the person you’re talking to. My way of doing this was jailbreaking my phone and using snapbreak. you can find tutorials on how to jailbreak everywhere and downloading snapbreak you’ll have to downgrade snapchat first. keep in mind recently snapchat has been banning accounts that have downgraded there snapchat so a way to get around this is to create the account on the downgraded version of snapchat and NEVER update. if you update you won’t be able to use snapbreak without a ban. snapbreak is an amazing tool for all sorts of stuff. Uploading to live snap. faking location. quick switching between accounts, sending snaps to everyone on your snapchat (more than 200 people)
2) one of the first ways i used to get traffic to my account was POF. POF you can create an account with a phone number, with your girl’s pics of course. (do not put add my snap in the bio or you’ll be flagged on the system), just swipe right on everyone and ask everyone to add your snap, "hey add my snap ____ ", people who won’t add you will not buy shit so don’t waste your time. if you do get banned on POF you can use the same phone number a few more times till your perma banned. it’s all about high quality traffic. If you get shit traffic you’ll have a bunch of time wasters on your snap that’s never going to buy. Refrain from doing sfs with other snap chatters unless you want shit traffic. Tinder is also a good source for high quality traffic. all tough once your banned on iPhone you will be mac banned. Changing your ip won’t work and even on a jailbroken iPhone you can’t change your mac. On android devices you can change your mac with rooted devices. I personally wouldn’t go through the effort and I would just make tinder accounts through pc. You can download tmac v6, and any proxy VPN will work. Always remember to clear cookies before creating a new account. Eventually you will run out of phone numbers to use once you get banned but we will get into that in the next step.
​​​​​​​3) Smspva.com and smspool are great tools to get disposable phone numbers to create new accounts. For a small payment of like 50c to $1 per phone number. This can be paid through bitcoin. Hopefully you’ve made enough money at this stage through the traffic you got from your own number. (Yes using your own number is fine if you don’t care about getting banned from TindePOF) anyways. We will talk about how to get your ewhoring money into bitcoin in the next step.
4) Once your money is in bitcoin you can do whatever you want with it, in PayPal if you keep the money in your account to long it can be risked getting locked since you’ll be creating a PayPal account with your girls name/email. PayPal will constantly ask you to verify your account by adding a credit card or sometimes locking your account until you send proof of id. You can only get a maximum of 2500 per unverified PayPal account before they ask for verification (proof of id) you can create new PayPal accounts with new phone numbers through smspva/smspool. Paxful is a great tool to transfer your PayPal money to bitcoin. all tough ive heard you can trade PayPal to bitcoin on multiple other sites. Paxful was the one to work best for me. As I wouldn’t recommend keeping money in your PayPal account to long I suggest getting it into bitcoin asap. After a while paxful will ask for verification on your account. At this point you can just create a new account with a new email/phone number using smspool. I don’t think smspva has paxful verification phone numbers. Personally I traded about 300 at a time on paxful. And id be very wary of scammers. Once the bitcoin is in your paxful wallet. Transfer it to a third party wallet like Blockchain.
5) Let’s get back to the snapchat, remember it’s all about social engineering, get rid of the time wasters, all you want to do is create a private story to post a bunch of nude videos in and put on your main story and try advertise to everyone that your selling a premium snapchat, my prices were 20 monthly 30 lifetime to be a premium member. I charged 40 an hour for video calls. Yes I just blocked them after I received the payment. I charged 150 an hour 400 a night for meetups. With meetup scams I would ask them to pay a 75 deposit through PayPal and id send them the address, they can pay rest cash in hand or in PayPal. Once they would arrive at the address I’ve sent, (this would be a random for sale or address where no one lives in) I would tell them to pay the rest in PayPal and I’ll let them into the house. Even if they said they’d pay the rest in cash id still try tricking them into sending the rest of the payment in PayPal. I’ve made 750 of one guy using this method.
Tips:

any feed back on this method would be greatly appreciated, tell me what you think :)
submitted by ryansheraa to IllegalLifeProTips [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

August / September monthly report from v1docq47 (CCS + XRM.RU)

This is my monthly progress report (CCS.html) + XMR.RU).
Below is a list of what has been done and translated into Russian for two months of my work.

Monero Video (YouTube)

The following video posted on Monero Russian Community YouTube Channel.

Weekly News:

Short Q&A about Monero:

Monero into Russian (Translation)

The following articles / guides have been translated into Russian and posted on the XMR.RU website and my Github repository.
Note: If you would like to read the original article in English, then, open the article you are interested in, and at the end of each article you will find a link to the source.

Critical Decentralisation Cluster 36c3 (transcriptions (EN + RU) + translation (RU)):

01 - Monero Introduction (Diego "rehrar" Salazar) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 02 - RIAT Introduction (parasew) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 03 - Swiss Cryptoeconomics Assembly (polto, Ome) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 04 - Namecoin Introduction (Jeremy Rand) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 05 - Open Hardware developed at FOSSASIA (Mario Behling) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 06 - Paralelni Polis (Juraj Bednar) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 07 - Introduction to Replicant (dllud, Denis ‘GNUtoo’ Carikli)​ | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 08 - Open Source Hardware and OSHWA (Drew Fustini) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 09 - ImplicitCAD (Juila Longtin) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 10 - Program in Detail | Transcriptions - EN / RU / XMR.RU 11 - about:freedom (Bonnie Mehring, Blipp)​ | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 13 - Funding Models of FOSS (Diego “rehrar” Salazar) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 14 - The Sharp Forks We Follow​ | Transcriptions - EN / RU / XMR.RU 16 - P2P Trading in Cryptoanarchy | Transcriptions - EN / RU / XMR.RU 17 - Monero’s Adaptive Blockweight Approach to Scaling | Transcriptions - EN / RU / XMR.RU 18 - Nym (Harry Halpin)​ | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 19 - Digital Integrity of the Human Person | Transcriptions - EN / RU / XMR.RU 20 - cyber~Congress (Sergey Simanovsky) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 21 - KYC & Crypto-AML Tools (polto) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 22 - Parallel Polis, Temporary Autonomous Zones and Beyond | Transcriptions - EN / RU 23 - MandelBot:HAB - Open Source Ecotecture and Horizontalism | Transcriptions - EN / RU 24 - Adventures and Experiments Adding Namecoin to Tor Browser | Transcriptions - EN / RU 25 - Fair Data Society (Gregor Zavcer) | Transcriptions - EN.md) / RU.md) / XMR.RU 45 - Designing a Communal Computing Interface | Transcriptions - EN / RU / XMR.RU 47 - Hackatoshi’s Flying Circuit | Transcriptions - EN / RU / XMR.RU

Zero to Monero - Second Edition

https://www.overleaf.com/read/hcmqnvgtfmyh - Chapter 00 - Abstract - Chapter 01 - Introduction - Chapter 02 - Basic Concepts - Chapter 03 - Advanced Schnorr-like Signatures

Monero Outreach Articles

Getmonero.org Posts Blog

LocalMonero Articles

Note: You need "Change Language" to Russian - Why Monero Has A Tail Emission - How CLSAG Will Improve Monero's Efficiency - How Monero Solved the Block Size Problem That Plagues Bitcoin - How Ring Signatures Obscure Monero's Outputs - Monero Best Practices for Beginners - Monero Outputs Explained

Monero Meeting logs

CCS Result / Report

Monero News

Other Articles

Pull / Merge Request

Monero Project Translations (Weblate)

Thanks for your support!
submitted by v1docq47 to Monero [link] [comments]

Someone has been killed aboard my ship. And the murderer is still onboard. [PART 4]

Bring up the file, I clicked play. The footage began, revealing its contents inside the ventilation shafts, winding it to the ventilation in the heads. Quinton also brushed up against me, watching in anticipation, brushing up against me in surprise.
"And so it ends here," Quinton exclaimed, his eyes kept on the video, withdrawing his senior sailor issued shotgun, "I'm going to shoot that bastard."
A muffled screech, and we watched at the screen, as the ventilation panel cover popped off and was removed by a gloved hand. A skinny man crawled in, identity hidden by the gariny footage.
"Goddamit, can they not afford good cameras," an exasperated Quinton said.
"Shut up," I shot back, "I want to watch this."
"Me too, aye sir." We watched as the figure unscrewed the other shaft, as the black jacket covering his uniform twisted. Finally, one of its zippers ripped open, revealing the naval camoflauge around it.
Viktor.
That nametag was indistingushable - the Eastern European name was unmistakably him. Out of nowhere, a pistol being cocked, as its hammer sprang forward slamming the spring. We had been caught.
"So, a bit of late night espionage?" he said menacingly. I watched as Quinton slowly turned around, and using his hands, flicked the pistol to the floor, the background filled with crashing waves.
That's when a I realised that the ship arrives in port tommorow at this time. Quinton masterfully jumped up, knocking Viktor, dressed in the black jacket rammed Quinton across.
"HEY! SOMEONE!" I yelled, trying to draw and brandish my own pistol, flicking the safety switch. "I already gassed all of them. Painlessly," Viktor said unemotionally and coldly as he ran into Quinton again, knocking him to the ground.
Aiming the pistol, I squeezed the trigger. Viktor rammed Quinton, and stomped on him, keeping his boot squeezed against his stomach, before holding out a firing pin, etched with my serial number.
"I also already tampered with your pistol. You went on. Carelessly," he said as he smirked. That's when he raised his pistol, and shot Quinton. Quinton jarred, his mouth open, and fell back cracking his head on the floor. I inched back, trying desperately to press it, hoping he was fluking, as he laughed with insidious intent.
"I control this ship!" he screamed triumphantly, "and when this ship sails into port tommorow, it is I who shall be the hero! You shall be the criminal!" he continued, "And while you are renditioned to Pine Gap, and waterboarded endlessly, I shall rise up!" he boomed with a final screeching laughter, before kicking me in the face and slamming my head into the ground.
"Why? Why?" I tried to say, as my mouth started to swell.
"How well do you know me?" he started off with.
"I know you now better than I'll ever do," I groaned in pain. "Why do you think I am doing this?" he laughed. "Because you're evil," I replied with, earning me another kick, this time in the stomach sending me yelling out all sorts of obscenities.
"Do you know what you have done?" he yelled in anger, "the Australian Government has betrayed me! Forgotten me! A long time ago, I was a commando! I served in Africa, in the Middle East! And then they forgot about me! I had to find my way back! And do you know what they have given me? Nothing!"
"And so you steal a navy ship and murder 20 people," I muttered.
"I will be remembered. I will be victorious! I shall use my power to abuse the brass who had abused me 5 years ago! You read through my file! You know my abilities!"
"You're also a high school drop out," I shot back. "Intelligence... does not rely on human intelligence!" the demented madman screamed out, busy shouting in all his self glory as he cheered, "We will arrive in Cairns tommorow! You will be escorted out in handcuffs! You will admit to your crimes in front of the Port Inspector and the Naval Police!"
"What if they review the footage?" I questioned him.
"They won't," came an iron voice booming from the intercom. The voice of my very own commander - Captain Daniels.
"You never heard anything," Viktor said, as I wallowed in my defeat, "right, James?"
"I never would've taken you, out of all people, as a traitor! That's why you placed him on my cabin guard! That's why I've been thumping into him as he-"
"Yes, Commander. He has been trying to pick your locks. He's been eavesdropping, listening to you," the Captain replied calmly. I saw his face on video call, his hands obscuring the sides webcam on his computer. A thin, wiry tall man in navy whites, sitting comfortably on his office desk, earning is $40 a hour payslip, with an oblivious number of personnel working around him probably trying to solve this situation. "
Why?" I screamed at the computer, slurring my speech, unable to form words as blood started to come from my mouth. A cut flap of my tough interferred in my speech.
"Because I too, am horrified at Viktor's mistreatment. And also, I would also like to be a hundred thousand dollars richer. Has that money been transferred?" he said.
"Yes. Check your offshore for one half, and your bitcoin wallet for the other half. All 100,000 AUD worth of currency." They both began to laugh, torturing my senses. They were responsible for the death of all of my crew. And here I was, injured, basking in my hopelessness and guilt. That's when I saw Quintons boatswains pipe. Grabbing it, while they were still distracted, I made my move.
"Excuse me?"
"Hm?" he said as he looked over. I leaped, and I thrust the boatswain pipe into his hip, laughing at his screaming, before jabbing it up his nose, and releasing it as I heard his nose snapping at my force, before pushing myself off. He picked up his pistol and fired it, hitting the communications broadcaster. I ran out of the room, slamming the door, watching as he blindly fired into all of the computers, screaming in frustration, disconnecting the swearing Captain, rendering the intercoms to silence. He ran out, reloading, when I dismounted a fire extinguisher and swung it against his chest, missing his head, smashing the glass on the door.
Ripping off the tags with my already somewhat dislodged teeth, I slammed the lever and sprayed the powdery and foamy solution onto him, as he slid down the stairs and slid down the hall, slamming through the doors and into the other room. Picking up the shard of glass, I ripped off a ventilation panel cover, and breathed in as I climbed through, and slid the cover back on, listening to his howling cries of pain and determination. Inside the vent, I breathed out, and talked aloud in relative safety.
"It was time to finish this," I muttered as I began to wait in anticipation
PART 1:
https://www.reddit.com/nosleep/comments/ivmvw3/someone_has_been_killed_aboard_my_ship_and_the/
PART 2: https://www.reddit.com/nosleep/comments/iw8ncc/someone_has_been_killed_aboard_my_ship_and_the/
PART 3 - https://www.reddit.com/nosleep/comments/iwvnp9/someone_has_been_killed_aboard_my_ship_and_the/
FINALE -
https://www.reddit.com/nosleep/comments/iy6mkl/someone_has_been_killed_aboard_my_ship_and_the/
submitted by DryVespers to nosleep [link] [comments]

hodlmon.sh: a UTXO monitoring methodology and script for true connoisseurs of security, paranoia and BTC maximalism

EDIT:
Disclaimer: the below script is provided for example purposes only. You're responsible for your own security. Don't trust, verify.
tldr: the script is literally just an example wrapper to call "gettxout" on your own node via cron to check if your own utxo has been spent yet
OK, since there are a few questions on security below, let me clarify: this script is only for people who are 1) already running their own nodes and 2) can understand the bash script below. And obviously, don't trust some random person on the internet, always verify. I provided this as an example for a way to monitor your own UTXOs with your existing node. Those of you who understand what the below script does will see it's painfully simple and obviously harmless. Those of you who don't understand it, just ignore this post, or better yet, research what the below means until you do understand it. What's important is the idea of monitoring your own UTXO, and this script is an example of how to do that with gettxout.
ORIGINAL POST:
Submitting this to help strengthen the community, and for review:
hodlmon.sh: a UTXO monitoring methodology and script for true connoisseurs of security, paranoia and BTC maximalism
Monitor canary UTXOs for early detection of compromised private keys BEFORE funds are lost, using your own full node for maximum privacy and trustlessness. Note that you will need to implement your own notification strategy (email, push, sms, etc). This script is intended to run on your full node, but can be run from any machine with RPC access to your full node.
hodlmon.sh is designed to check if a given UTXO (i.e. a specific output of a specific btc transaction) has been spent or not. This can be used for early and proactive detection if a seed phrase or private key has been compromised, so you have time to move your btc before full compromise happens. In order for this to work, a small amount of btc should be sent to an address controlled only by a given seedphrase, with that seedphrase being part of a multisig wallet or a seedphrase+passphrase wallet, and the majority of your funds controlled in the seedphrase+passphrase or multisig wallet. The idea is to leave the small amount of btc (the canary utxo) in the address, so that it never moves unless the seedphrase that controls it has been compromised and all funds in the wallet swept. In this way, you use those compromised sats to buy information about the current security status of your wallet(s).
Example usage:Set up a cron job to run hodlmon.sh every 30 min to check if transaction output at index "0" for transaction with id "123" has been spent already. Use "my_utxo_nickname" as a friendly name for the UTXO (to differentiate between multiple wallets)
*/30 * * * * /path/to/hodlmon.sh 123 0 my_utxo_nickname > /tmp/hodlmon_log 2> /tmp/hodlmon_err_log
Usage scenario #1: Seedphrase (A) + passphrase (A')Majority of funds are held in a wallet controlled by both the seedphrase and passphrase, A and A'. A token amount of btc is controlled only by seedphrase A.
A + A': majority of funds
A: canary UTXO
hodlmon.sh is used to monitor the canary funds locked by A, so that if it is discovered that A has been compromised, the funds locked by A and A' can be moved to a new wallet before the passphrase A' can be cracked and all your funds exfiltrated.
Usage scenario #2: multisig e.g. 2 of 3, with seed phrases A, B and CMajority of funds held in a multisig wallet controlled by 3 seedphrases A, B, and C. 3 small canary UTXOs are held in wallets each controlled by A, B or C, respectively.
A + B + C: majority of funds
A: canary UTXO 1
B: canary UTXO 2
C: canary UTXO 3
One benefit of multisig (e.g. 2 of 3) is that even if 1 key is compromised, your funds are safe, since at least 2 keys are needed to release funds. But how do you that none of the keys has yet been compromised? If you create separate wallets controlled each by only 1 of the individual keys, and use hodlmon.sh to monitor whether those UTXOs have been exfiltrated, then you can detect partial compromise of your setup before a full exfiltration event takes place, so you can move your funds to a new multisig wallet with freshly generated and uncompromised keys.
Example of 3 cronjobs to monitor all 3 canary UTXOs:
*/30 * * * * /path/to/hodlmon.sh 123 0 key1 > /tmp/hodlmon_log_1 2> /tmp/hodlmon_err_log_1
*/30 * * * * /path/to/hodlmon.sh 456 0 key2 > /tmp/hodlmon_log_2 2> /tmp/hodlmon_err_log_2
*/30 * * * * /path/to/hodlmon.sh 789 0 key3 > /tmp/hodlmon_log_3 2> /tmp/hodlmon_err_log_3

Example hodlmon script:
#########################################################################
#!/bin/bash
touch /tmp/hodlmon_last_run
echo "Transaction ID: $1"
echo "Output #: $2"
echo "Nickname: $3"
NODE_IP=127.0.0.1 #TODO: use actual value
USER=user#TODO: use actual value
PASS=pass #TODO: use actual value
PORT=8332 #TODO: use actual value
CHECK_CMD="/uslocal/bin/bitcoin-cli -rpcconnect=$NODE_IP -rpcuser=$USER -rpcpassword=$PASS -rpcport=$PORT gettxout $1 $2"
RESULT="$($CHECK_CMD)"
echo "${RESULT}"
if [ "$RESULT" == "" ]
then
echo "UTXO HAS BEEN SPENT! RED ALERT!!"
MSG="The UTXO for $3 from tx $1 output $2 has moved!"
#TODO: ADD YOUR FAVORITE NOTIFICATION STRATEGY E.G. EMAIL, PUSH NOTIFICATION, SMS
else
echo "UTXO is still on ice"
fi
############################################

submitted by facepalm5000 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The next XVG? Microcap 100x potential actually supported by fundamentals!

What’s up team? I have a hot one for you. XVG returned 12 million percent in 2017 and this one reminds me a lot of it. Here’s why:
Mimblewimble is like Blu-Ray compared to CD-ROM in terms of its ability to compress data on a blockchain. The current BTC chain is 277gb and its capacity is limited because every time you spend a coin, each node needs to validate its history back to when it was mined (this is how double spending is prevented). Mimblewimble is different - all transactions in a block are aggregated and netted out in one giant CoinJoin, and only the current spending needs to be verified. This means that dramatically more transactions can fit into a smaller space, increasing throughput and lowering fees while still retaining the full proof of work game theory of Bitcoin. These blockchains are small enough to run a full node on a cheap smartphone, which enhances the decentralization and censorship resistance of the network.
The biggest benefit, though, is that all transactions are private - the blockchain doesn’t reveal amounts or addresses except to the actual wallet owner. Unlike earlier decoy-based approaches that bloat the chain and can still be data mined (XMR), Mimblewimble leaves no trace in the blockchain, instead storing only the present state of coin ownership.
The first two Mimblewimble coins, Grin and Beam, launched to great fanfare in 2019, quickly reaching over $100m in market cap (since settled down to $22m and $26m respectively). They are good projects but grin has infinite supply and huge never-decreasing emission, and Beam is a corporate moneygrab whose founding investors are counting on you buying for their ROI.
ZEC is valued at $568m today, despite the facts that only 1% of transactions are actually shielded, it has a trusted setup, and generating a confidential transaction takes ~60 seconds on a powerful PC. XMR is a great project but it’s valued at $1.2b (so no 100x) and it uses CryptoNote, which is 2014 tech that relies on a decoy-based approach that could be vulnerable to more powerful computers in the future. Mimblewimble is just a better way to approach privacy because there is simply no data recorded in the blockchain for companies to surveil.
Privacy is not just for darknet markets, porn, money launderers and terrorists. In many countries it’s dangerous to be wealthy, and there are all kinds of problems with having your spending data be out there publicly and permanently for all to see. Namely, companies like Amazon are patenting approaches to identify people with their crypto addresses, “for law enforcement” but also so that, just like credit cards, your spending data can be used to target ads. (A) Coinbase is selling user data to the DEA, IRS, FBI, Secret Service, and who knows who else? (B) What about insurance companies raising your premiums or canceling your policy because they see you buying (legal) cannabis? If your business operates using transparent cryptocurrency, competitors can data mine your customer and supply chain data, and employees can see how much everyone else gets paid. I could go on, but the idea of “I have nothing to hide, so what do I care about privacy?” will increasingly ring hollow as people realize that this money printing will have to be paid by massive tax increases AND that those taxes will be directly debited from their “Central Bank Digital Currency” wallets.
100% privacy for all transactions also eliminates one HUGE problem that people aren’t aware of yet, but they will be: fungibility. Fungibility means that each coin is indistinguishable from any other, just like paper cash. Why is this important? Because of the ever-expanding reach of AML/KYC/KYT (Anti-Money Laundering / Know Your Customer / Know Your Transaction) as regulators cramp down on crypto and banks take over, increasingly coins become “tainted” in various ways. For example, if you withdraw coins to a mixing service like Wasabi or Samourai, you may find your account blocked. (C) The next obvious step is that if you receive coins that these chainalysis services don’t like for whatever reason, you will be completely innocent yet forced to prove that you didn’t know that the coins you bought were up to no good in a past life. 3 days ago, $100k of USDC was frozen. (D) Even smaller coins like LTC now have this problem, because “Chinese Drug Kingpins” used them. (E) I believe that censorable money that can be blocked/frozen isn’t really “your money”.
Epic Cash is a 100% volunteer community project (like XVG and XMR) that had a fair launch in September last year with no ICO and no premine. There are very few projects like this, and it’s a key ingredient in Verge’s success (still at $110m market cap today despite being down 97% since the bubble peak) and why it’s still around. It has a small but super passionate community of “Freemen” who are united by a belief in the sound money economics of Bitcoin Standard emission (21m supply limit and ever-decreasing inflation) and the importance of privacy.
I am super bullish on this coin for the following reasons:
Because it doesn’t have a huge marketing budget in a sea of VC-funded shitcoins, it is as-yet undiscovered, which is why it’s so cheap. There are only 4 Mimblewimble-based currencies on the market: MWC at $162m, BEAM at $26m, GRIN at $22m, and EPIC at $0.4m. This is not financial advice and as always, do your own research, but I’ve been buying this gem for months and will continue to.
This one ticks all the boxes for me, the only real problem is that it’s hard to buy much without causing a huge green candle. Alt season is coming, and coins like this are how your neighbor Chad got his Lambo back in 2017. For 2021, McLaren is a better choice and be sure to pay cash so that it doesn’t get repossessed like Chad!
  1. A https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/d35eax/amazon-bitcoin-patent-data-stream-identify-cryptocurrency-for-law-enforcement-government
  2. B https://decrypt.co/31461/coinbase-wants-to-identify-bitcoin-users-for-dea-irs
  3. C https://www.coindesk.com/binance-blockade-of-wasabi-wallet-could-point-to-a-crypto-crack-up
  4. D https://cointelegraph.com/news/centre-freezes-ethereum-address-holding-100k-usdc
  5. E https://www.coindesk.com/us-treasury-blacklists-bitcoin-litecoin-addresses-of-chinese-drug-kingpins
  6. F https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWkTxl5Z6DNN0ASMRxSKV5g
  7. G http://epic.tech/whitepaper
  8. H https://medium.com/epic-cash/epic-cash-on-uniswap-22447904d375
  9. I https://epic.tech/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/figure-3.1.jpg
Links:
submitted by pinchegringo to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by almkglor [link]
This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given private key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

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Particl Marketplace: Where Sellers Meet Buyers

Particl Marketplace: Where Sellers Meet Buyers
People had been speculating since the dawn of crypto when the world’s largest online marketplaces, the ones of the Amazon caliber like eBay, Etsy or AliExpress, and, well, Amazon itself, would start to accept cryptocurrencies. There were a slew of rumors, opinions, and theories thickly interspersed with false reports popping up here and there of Amazon and its little cousins being on the verge of embracing cryptocurrencies. On top of that, someone has actually posted a petition on change.org to add Ether to Amazon as a payment method.
by StealthEX
Long story short, that was a waste of time. High hopes fell flat, and people lost religion. But not all. As the common wisdom goes, when hope dies, action begins. This exposition describes one such effort which tries to bring to fruition the idea of a decentralized marketplace for trading goods and services. And as you might have already figured it out, with a cryptocurrency as a means of payment. So let’s welcome Particl Marketplace and see what it has to offer – and what Amazon has missed.

What is it, in simple words?

Particl Marketplace is an online marketplace where you can trade goods and services. Not a big deal, you may think. However, what distinguishes it from places like Amazon as well as cryptocurrency-enabled marketplaces is the decentralized nature of purchases on Particl. You can think of it as a variety of a decentralized cryptocurrency exchange (aka DEX) where trades are being conducted on-chain. But in case of Particl, it is goods and services that are being traded, not fiat or crypto, with deals on-chain as well, fully encrypted and decentralized.
Particl is a global peer-to-peer privacy-centered marketplace that uses an automated two-party escrow system. It is crypto-agnostic and designed to work with any cryptocurrency, creating a secure, highly-scalable environment supported by a privacy-focused blockchain-based platform. The team behind the project sees its mission in developing “a new decentralized, private and democratic economy” that is governed by the network of its users, with no central authority or middleman getting in the way.
In the project developers’ own words, Particl enables everyone to participate in a free, anonymous exchange of all kinds of goods, without paying any fee and regardless of geographical location. To be sure, you are already thinking about Silk Road and its dark fate, and that the government is going to crack down monumentally on Particl one day. Well, the outcome may vary as the payments on the platform are made using its own cryptocurrency PART, with its laser focus on privacy and anonymity. But more on this later.

How did it grow up?

The development of the Particl project started in early 2017 with the release of the white paper describing the team’s vision for the marketplace, which was shortly followed by a successful seed funding that brought in enough funds ($750,000) to support the development of the project for a year (it turned out sufficient to last for over two years).
These donations helped to establish the Particl Foundation, a non-profit Swiss organization with the goal of providing legal protection for the project to ensure its sustained development and compliance with government regulations. It receives 10% of all the staking rewards generated on the Particl network, making the project self-sustainable and free for most uses.
Unlike other such projects in the crypto arena, Particl has been using its own blockchain from day one, which happened to be July 17, 2017. It was specifically designed to be crypto agnostic by supporting and working with any cryptocurrency. Additionally, it supported the smart contract tech out of the box, giving users an ability to build all kinds of decentralized applications (dApps) that can be directly integrated into the Particl marketplace.
On May 31, 2018, the Particl Marketplace, the Holy Grail of the entire endeavor, was made available for alpha testing on the testnet of the project, which later split into development and stable branches. It went live with the mainnet release of the Particl Open Marketplace on August 12, 2019, which featured Particl Desktop 2.0.0, a client-side application providing user interface and built-in wallet functions.
On November 25, 2019, the Particl Desktop 2.3.0 client was released that enabled Bitcoin payments and marked the introduction of untraceable transactions. With the help of the new in-wallet exchange module, everyone can easily swap their bitcoins for the native PART coin. Moreover, the module allows seamless integration of third-party accountless exchange services right into the marketplace, with StealthEX being one of them.

How is it different from other marketplaces?

The common solution many P2P marketplaces implement to protect buyers and sellers from the other party failing to honor their end of the bargain is through third-party escrow, where the “third-party” in the majority of places and cases is the platform itself that the market participants must mutually trust. In short, it is a single point of failure. And the selling (pardon the pun) point of the entire Particl’s marketplace is its decentralized escrow, which is a thing entirely between the two parties engaged. No middlemen allowed here!
And these are not empty words. Particl implements the concept best known as Mutually Assured Destruction (aptly shortened as MAD), a military doctrine you are certainly familiar with, and probably even afraid of, that consists in a mutual destruction of two belligerent parties in an all-out nuclear holocaust. If you are curious, the idea stems from the game theory and has a lot to do with the Nash Equilibrium, of John Nash’s fame. In a nutshell, Particl removes the need for a trusted escrow agent by introducing MAD escrow smart contracts.
A MAD escrow contract allows to lock funds in a multi-signature address that can be released only if all the parties sign off on the transaction. So both the seller and the buyer lock in the contract an agreed amount for a specified period of time, with the buyer also depositing the payment for the items purchased. The escrowed funds are released when both parties confirm the fulfillment of the agreement. Should one party break the terms, the funds remain locked for good causing a mutual financial loss until both parties agree to sign off.
Another crucial aspect of Particl Marketplace is its end-to-end privacy. The problem with conventional marketplaces acting as an escrow agent is that the communication between the parties should be open to the agent for it to serve as an arbitrator. With Particl, it is no longer required, and all messages between the buyer and the seller are encrypted. Despite being public, only their recipient can decrypt them, which effectively makes messages untraceable.
This is also where the PART coin turns up quite handy. It enables three different privacy modes, and with the most secure mode, the Anon mode, PART transactions utilize the RingCT privacy protocol, which hides both the amount transferred and the identity of the parties transacting. Accordingly, every part of the entire Particl trading environment is thoroughly decentralized, and the full anonymity of market participants is maintained at all times, making the platform a completely trustless marketplace. Big Brother is no longer watching you.
Aside from that, you can stake PART and generate a source of passive income for yourself. Particl uses a custom Proof-of-Stake consensus protocol, allowing you to get a piece of the pie in the form of new coins created at each block according to the scheduled inflation process. The annual inflation rate is initially set to 5% and goes down 1 percentage point every year until it finally floors at 2% indefinitely. Moreover, these rates are a bare minimum as they assume that all PART coins have been staked. Otherwise, the income will be bigger and better as the same rewards are paid to fewer coins.
Additionally, your passive income through staking PART will be augmented by the fees generated through the everyday marketplace operations. Whether it is network fees collected via PART transactions or marketplace listing fees paid by the sellers, all of them contribute to the stakers’ rewards. At the end of the day, staking PART can turn into a profitable business once the Particl platform starts to attract more traffic. In simple words, the more popular the market gets, the more fees it generates, the more coins the stakers earn.
As PART is a standalone cryptocurrency, it can be used outside Particl Marketplace as well. So if you plan on using it for purposes other than eCommerce, it is traded on several exchanges, for example, HitBTC and Bittrex, with more exchanges to list PART in the future. There are native Particl wallets available for storing PART such as Particl Qt with Ledger support, Particl-cli, and Particl Copay Wallet, with the latter available for both the desktop and the mobile. There is also a third-party multicurrency Flare Wallet, enabling cold staking for Particl.
Running Particl is a collective effort, which means no operational costs and no company bagging profits from it. The marketplace buyers don’t pay any commissions other than tiny network confirmation fees, while the sellers are only charged a small listing fee to keep spam listings to a minimum. This creates a highly competitive environment, with the sellers making more profits and the buyers having access to cheaper goods and services as a result.

What’s in the pipeline?

The next major release of the Particl Marketplace should have been Particl Desktop 2.4.0, but it was later rebranded as Particl Desktop 3.0 to reflect its breakthrough nature. It is set for release in the second half of 2020 and will enable the addition of user-created markets and storefronts, effectively turning the Particl marketplace into a network of specialized markets.
And if you think about it, that makes perfect sense. Say, you have a social network account highly merited and full of karma that you want to sell, whatever your reasons might be. Then creating a dedicated market for trading such accounts privately and securely may look extremely appealing to you. Whether it is the right thing to do is another matter, of course.
Kidding aside, it is obviously not about selling or offering something that the society on the whole doesn’t approve of or frowns upon. If you are a freelancer, for example, a graphics designer or a translator, you would be certainly interested in the future freelancer markets – along with your potential employers. Put simply, birds of a feather should flock together.
To keep things in perspective, popular freelancer markets that exist today charge up to 10-20% of what you would get from your client if you negotiated directly. All in all, establishing communities across the marketplace seems to be the next logical step in the natural evolution and growth of the platform. In fact, it is a little surprising that the Particl team didn’t come up with this idea earlier.
Meanwhile, we wish Particl success and good luck in achieving their goals and aspirations.
And remember if you need to exchange your coins StealthEX is here for you. We provide a selection of more than 250 coins and constantly updating the list so that our customers will find a suitable option. Our service does not require registration and allows you to remain anonymous. Why don’t you check it out? Just go to StealthEX and follow these easy steps:
✔ Choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. For example ETH to PART.
✔ Press the “Start exchange” button.
✔ Provide the recipient address to which the coins will be transferred.
✔ Move your cryptocurrency for the exchange.
✔ Receive your PART coins!
Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get StealthEX.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us via [email protected].
The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.
Original article was posted on https://stealthex.io/blog/2020/08/26/particl-marketplace-where-sellers-meet-buyers/
submitted by Stealthex_io to StealthEX [link] [comments]

No, a quantum computer won't instantly reward you with 69,000 Bitcoins ... yet

This post was originally published on this siteThis post was originally published on this siteA Bitcoin wallet with nearly $700 million is up for grabs — but anyone intending to be a “crypto thief” and nab it will have to crack the password first. Crypto Twitter user Alon Gal has put out a call to his 29,900 followers for solutions on how […]
submitted by FuzzyOneAdmin to fuzzyone [link] [comments]

Crypto Banking Wars: Can BlockFi & Celsius Disrupt Banking?

Crypto Banking Wars: Can BlockFi & Celsius Disrupt Banking?
These crypto lending & borrowing services found early traction. Are they capable of bundling more financial services and winning the broader consumer finance market?
https://reddit.com/link/icps9l/video/98kl1y596zh51/player
This is the third part of Crypto Banking Wars — a new series that examines what crypto-native company is most likely to become the bank of the future. Who is best positioned to reach mainstream adoption in consumer finance?
While crypto allows the world to get rid of banks, a bank will still very much be necessary for this very powerful technology to reach the masses. As we laid out in our previous series, Crypto-Powered, we believe a crypto-native company will ultimately become the bank of the future. We’re confident Genesis Block will have a seat at that table, but we aren’t the only game in town.
In the first post of this series, we did an analysis of big crypto exchanges like Coinbase & Binance. In our second episode, we looked at the world of non-custodial wallets.
Today we’re analyzing crypto lending & borrowing services. The Earn and Borrow use-case covers a lot of what traditional banks deliver today. This category of companies is a threat worth analyzing. As we look at this market, we’ll mostly be focused on custodial, centralized products like BlockFi, Nexo, and Celsius.
Many of these companies found early traction among crypto users. Are they capable of bundling more financial services and winning the broader consumer finance market? Let’s find out.

Institutional Borrowers

Because speculation and trading remains one of the most popular use-cases of crypto, a new crypto sub-industry around credit has emerged. Much of the borrowing demand has been driven by institutional needs.
For example, a Bitcoin mining company might need to borrow fiat to pay for operational costs (salaries, electricity). Or a crypto company might need to borrow USD to pay for engineering salaries. Or a crypto hedge fund needs to borrow for leverage or to take a specific market position. While all of these companies have sufficient crypto to cover the costs, they might not want to sell it — either for tax or speculative reasons (they may believe these crypto assets will appreciate, as with most in the industry).
Instead of selling their crypto, these companies can use their crypto as collateral for loans. For example, they can provide $1.5M in Bitcoin as collateral, and borrow $1M. Given the collateralization happening, the underwriting process becomes straightforward. Companies all around the world can participate — language and cultural barriers are removed.

https://preview.redd.it/z9pby83d6zh51.png?width=600&format=png&auto=webp&s=54bf425215c3ed6d5ff0ca7dbe571e735b994613
The leader (and one of our partners) in this space is Genesis Capital. While they are always the counterparty for both lenders and borrowers, they are effectively a broker. They are at the center of the institutional crypto lending & borrowing markets. Their total active loans as of March 2020 was $649M. That number shot up to $1.42B in active loans as of June 2020. The growth of this entire market segment is impressive and it’s what is driving this opportunity for consumers downstream.

Consumer Products

While most of the borrowing demand comes from institutional players, there is a growing desire from consumers to participate on the lend/supply side of the market. Crypto consumers would love to be able to deposit their assets with a service and watch it grow. Why let crypto assets sit on an exchange or in cold storage when it can be earning interest?
A number of consumer-facing products have emerged in the last few years to make this happen. While they also allow users to borrow (always with collateral), most of the consumer attraction is around growing their crypto, even while they sleep. Earning interest. These products usually partner with institutional players like Genesis Capital to match the deposits with borrowing demand. And it’s exactly part of our strategy as well, beyond leveraging DeFi (decentralized finance protocols).
A few of the most popular consumer services in this category include BlockFi, Nexo, and Celsius.

https://preview.redd.it/vptig5mg6zh51.png?width=1051&format=png&auto=webp&s=b5fdc241cb9b6f5b495173667619f8d2c93371ca

BlockFi

BlockFi (Crunchbase) is the leader in this category (at least in the West). They are well-capitalized. In August 2019, they raised $18.3M in their Series A. In Feb 2020, they raised $30M in their Series B. In that same time period, they went from $250M in assets under management to $650M. In a recent blog post, they announced that they saw a 100% revenue increase in Q2 and that they were on track to do $50M in revenue this year. Their growth is impressive.
BlockFi did not do an ICO, unlike Celsius, Nexo, Salt, and Cred. BlockFi has a lot of institutional backing so it is perceived as the most reputable in the space. BlockFi started with borrowing — allowing users to leverage their crypto as collateral and taking out a loan against it. They later got into Earning — allowing users to deposit assets and earn interest on it. They recently expanded their service to “exchange” functionality and say they are coming out with a credit card later this year.

https://preview.redd.it/byv2tbui6zh51.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=bac080dcfc85e89574c30dfb396db0b537d46706
Security Woes
It’s incredible that BlockFi has been able to see such strong growth despite their numerous product and security woes. A few months ago, their systems were compromised. A hacker was able to access confidential data, such as names, dates of birth, postal addresses, and activity histories. While no funds were lost, this was a massive embarrassment and caused reputational damage.

https://preview.redd.it/lwmxbz5l6zh51.png?width=606&format=png&auto=webp&s=ebd8e6e5c31c56da055824254b35b218b49f80e0
Unrelated to that massive security breach and earlier in the year, a user discovered a major bug that allowed him to send the same funds to himself over and over again, ultimately accumulating more than a million dollars in his BlockFi account. BlockFi fortunately caught him just before withdrawal.
Poor Product Execution
Beyond their poor security — which they are now trying to get serious about — their products are notoriously buggy and hard-to-use. I borrowed from them a year ago and used their interest account product until very recently. I have first-hand experience of how painful it is. But don’t take my word for it… here are just a few tweets from customers just recently.

https://preview.redd.it/wcqu3icn6zh51.png?width=1055&format=png&auto=webp&s=870e2f06a6ec377a87e5d6d1f24579a901de66b5
For a while, their interest-earning product had a completely different authentication system than their loan product (users had two sets of usernames/passwords). Many people have had issues with withdrawals. The app is constantly logging people out, blank screens, ugly error messages. Emails with verification codes are sometimes delayed by hours (or days). I do wonder if their entire app has been outsourced. The sloppiness shines through.
Not only is their product buggy and UX confusing, but their branding & design is quite weak. To the left is a t-shirt they once sent me. It looks like they just found a bunch of quirky fonts, added their name, and slapped it on a t-shirt.

https://preview.redd.it/mi6yeppp6zh51.png?width=600&format=png&auto=webp&s=fd4cd8201ad0d5bc667498096388377895b72953
Culture
To the innocent bystander, many of these issues seem totally fixable. They could hire an amazing design agency to completely revamp their product or brand. They could hire a mercenary group of engineers to fix their bugs, etc. While it could stop the bleeding for a time, it may not solve the underlying issues. Years of sloppy product execution represents something much more destructive. It represents a top-down mentality that shipping anything other than excellence is okay: product experience doesn’t matter; design doesn’t matter; craftsmanship doesn’t matter; strong execution doesn’t matter; precision doesn’t matter. That’s very different from our culture at Genesis Block.
This cancerous mentality rarely stays contained within product & engineering — this leaks to all parts of the organization. No design agency or consulting firm will fix some of the pernicious values of a company’s soul. These are deeper issues that only leadership can course-correct.
If BlockFi’s sloppiness were due to constant experimentation, iteration, shipping, or some “move fast and break things” hacker culture… like Binance… I would probably cut them more slack. But there is zero evidence of that. “Move fast and break things” is always scary when dealing with financial products. But in BlockFi’s case, when it’s more like “move slow and break things,” they are really playing with fire. Next time a massive security breach occurs, like what happened earlier this year, they may not be so lucky.
Institutional Focus
Based on who is on their team, their poor product execution shouldn’t be a surprise. Their team comes mostly from Wall Street, not the blockchain community (where our roots are). Most of BlockFi’s blockchain/crypto integration is very superficial. They take crypto assets as deposits, but they aren’t leveraging any of the exciting, low-level DeFi protocols like we are.
While their Wall Street heritage isn’t doing them any favors on the product/tech side, it’s served them very well on winning institutional clients. This is perhaps their greatest strength. BlockFi has a strong institutional business. They recently brought on Three Arrows Capital as a strategic investor — a crypto hedge fund who does a lot of borrowing. In that announcement, BlockFi’s founder said that bringing them on “aligns well with our focus on international expansion of our institutional services offering.” They also recently brought someone on who will lead business development in Asia among institutional clients.
BlockFi Wrap Up
There are certainly BlockFi features that overlap with Genesis Block’s offering. It’s possible that they are angling to become the bank of the future. However, they simply have not proven they are capable of designing, building, and launching world-class consumer products. They’ve constantly had issues around security and poor product execution. Their company account and their founder’s account seem to only tweet about Bitcoin. I don’t think they understand, appreciate, or value the power of DeFi. It’s unlikely they’ll be leveraging it any time soon. All of these reasons are why I don’t see them as a serious threat to Genesis Block.
However, because of their strong institutional offering, I hope that Genesis Block will ultimately have a very collaborative and productive partnership with them. Assuming they figure out their security woes, we could park some of our funds with BlockFi (just as we will with Genesis Capital and others). I think what’s likely to happen is that we’ll corner the consumer market and we’ll work closely with BlockFi on the institutional side.
I’ve been hard on BlockFi because I care. I think they have a great opportunity at helping elevate the entire industry in a positive way. But they have a lot of issues they need to work through. I really don’t want to see users lose millions of dollars in a security breach. It could set back the entire industry. But if they do things well… a rising tide lifts all boats.

Honorable Mentions

Celsius (ICO Drops) raised $50M in an ICO, and is led by serial entrepreneur Alex Mashinsky. I’ve met him, he’s a nice guy. Similar to Binance, their biggest Achilles heel could be their own token. There are also a lot of unanswered questions about where their deposits go. They don’t have a record of great transparency. They recently did a public crowdraise which is a little odd given their large ICO as well as their supposed $1B in deposits. Are they running out of money, as some suggest? Unclear. One of their biggest blindspots right now is that Mashinsky does not understand the power of DeFi. He is frequently openly criticizing it.
Nexo (ICO Drops) is another similar service. They are European-based, trying to launch their own card (though they’ve been saying this forever and they still haven’t shipped it), and have a history in the payments/fintech space. Because they haven’t penetrated the US — which is a much harder regulatory nut to crack — they are unlikely to be as competitive as BlockFi. There were also allegations that Nexo was spreading FUD about Chainlink while simultaneously partnering with them. Did Nexo take out a short position and start spreading rumors? Never a dull moment in crypto.
Other players in the lending & borrowing space include Unchained Capital, Cred (ICO Drops), and Salt (ICO Drops).

https://preview.redd.it/9ts6m0qw6zh51.png?width=1056&format=png&auto=webp&s=dd8d368c1aa39994c6bc5e4baec10678d3bbba2d

Wrap Up

While many companies in this category seem to be slowly adding more financial services, I don’t believe any of them are focused on the broader consumer market like we are. To use services like BlockFi, Nexo, or Celsius, users need to be onboarded and educated on how crypto works. At Genesis Block, we don’t believe that’s the winning approach. We think blockchain complexity should be abstracted away from the end-user. We did an entire series about this, Spreading Crypto.
For many of these services, there is additional friction due to ICO tokens that are forcefully integrated into the product (see NEXO token or CEL Token). None of these services have true banking functionality or integration with traditional finance —for example, easy offramp or spending methods like debit cards. None of them are taking DeFi seriously — they are leveraging crypto for only the asset class, not the underlying technology around financial protocols.
So are these companies potential competitors to Genesis Block? For the crypto crowd, yes. For the mass market, no. None of these companies are capable of reaching the billions of people around the world that we hope to reach at Genesis Block.
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